Tips And Hints On Filing For Individual Personal Bankruptcy

Filing for bankruptcy will be a very crucial decision, so don't take it lightly. Read this article to find out more about personal bankruptcy and get the information you need to make an educated decision. You need to gain as much knowledge as you can prior to going through this ordeal.



Once you have filed for bankruptcy, you need to go over your finances and do your best to come up with a manageable budget. You want to do this so that you will not end up so deep in debt again that you will have to file for bankruptcy, again.

When it comes time for you to hire an attorney to deal with your bankruptcy, be sure to find one that has a ton of experience with personal bankruptcy. Learn about the charges you will have to pay, and how many of their associates will be working on your case.

Remember you still have to pay taxes on your debts. A lot of people don't realize that even if their debts are discharged in the bankruptcy, they are still responsible to the IRS. The IRS usually does not allow complete forgiveness, although payment plans are common. Make sure to find out what is covered and what is not.

Honesty may never have been as important as it will be when going through personal bankruptcy. Hiding income or assets may result in a dismissal from the court. It could also mean that you will be barred from ever having the opportunity to file for bankruptcy any time in the future.

After your bankruptcy has been discharged, or finalized, a good way to begin re-building your credit is to obtain a pre-paid credit card. This type of card is usually available at your local bank. The card is secured by the amount of money you load onto it. You can not charge more than what you have loaded onto the card, so over-spending shouldn't be a problem. on front page works like a regular credit card, with monthly statements and payments. After you have kept this card in good standing for a period of time, you may be able to have it switched into a regular, revolving credit card.

Consider filing Chapter 13 rather than Chapter 7, if you are facing foreclosure. A Chapter 13 bankruptcy allows you to create a restructured payment plan which includes your mortgage arrears. This will allow you to get your mortgage payments current, so that you won't lose your home. Chapter 13 doesn't require you to turn over property, so you don't have to worry about the homestead exemption, either.

It is important to protect your home when filing bankruptcy. Bankruptcy filings do not necessarily mean that you have to lose your house. You could keep your home; it depends on your home's value or if a second mortgage is on your home. If you meet certain criteria, you may be able to retain ownership of your home even after filing for bankruptcy.


You do not need to be bankrupt to file for personal bankruptcy. In 1898 the term was changed from "bankrupt" to "debtor" so that people could more readily understand that an inability to pay bills is the main qualifying factor in filing for personal bankruptcy. Most people who file are not, in fact, completely bankrupt.

Before you consider filing for bankruptcy, you should make a pre-determination if bankruptcy may be the right choice. First, make a list of all income, including, salary, child support, alimony, rent and any other sources you may have. Then, make a list of your bills. These would include mortgage, rent, car payments, monthly credit card payments, groceries and gas. If your monthly bill total is more than the income you bring in, it may be time to seek the advice of a bankruptcy attorney, who can help you make the final decision.

If you are getting sued and filing for bankruptcy, you may need to buy some time for the summary judgment to come through. If https://www.consumeraffairs.com/finance/tax-relief/ is the case, pay a filing fee to buy some time. Mail a letter to the opposing side stating "I dispute the validity of this debt." That will buy you more time.

Before filing for bankruptcy, it is important to still be smart with your finances. Be certain not to incur extra debt or increase the amount of debt you already have. Creditors and judges look at your current and past financial history when they make a decision about your personal bankruptcy. What responsible behavior will ultimately demonstrate is that you're on the right path. The longer you're able to show this, the more seriously you'll be taken by creditors.

Make sure that you fully understand the implications of declaring yourself bankrupt. Once you have filed for bankruptcy, you will find it difficult to secure any credit at all. While you may not see that consequence as a huge problem at the moment, if you wish to purchase a home in the future, or lease an automobile, you are probably going to need the credit.

In your personal bankruptcy documentation, don't forget to account for all debts, loans, and credit cards. Even if there is no debt on a credit card, list the credit card on your statement. Quite a few people overlook these items when filing, and they can lead to delays in the process.

If you are planning to file for bankruptcy, you must seriously take into account anyone who has cosigned on a loan for you. For instance, if a friend or relative is a cosigner on your auto or home loan, they will be held financially responsible to pay the debt in the event you file for bankruptcy. This can create problems in relationships between family members and friends. That is why it is not advisable to cosign for anyone or ask someone to cosign for you, including your children. It could ruin someone's life.

Continue to pay certain bills. Once you file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, you won't receive any more collection calls, and you may cease to receive certain bills. Remember that you are still under obligation to pay for your 'secured possessions', such as your home or vehicle, or you may lose them.

Understand that income tax should not be paid on any sort of debt discharge. This will save you a lot of money when it comes time to pay your taxes. Be sure to check with a tax specialist before you submit your taxes, in order to; make sure you're within the legal boundaries.

As you can see, you should give bankruptcy a lot of thought before deciding whether or not you should file. If bankruptcy is sensible option for you, a good and experienced bankruptcy attorney is a must have to help you begin the process of starting your financial situation anew.

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